After a concussion what to do

By Mubei | 13.07.2020

after a concussion what to do

8 Healthy Foods That Heal the Brain After Concussion

Parents and caregivers of children who have had a concussion can help them recover by taking an active role in their recovery: Having the child get plenty of rest. Keep a regular sleep schedule, including no late nights and no sleepovers. Making sure the child avoids high-risk/ high-speed activities. Jan 17,  · A proper evaluation after the injury as well as evidence-informed advice about proper concussion management can have a big impact on your recovery. The first 48 hours after concussion: What you can and can’t do. Rest: Do not go to sleep for at least 3 hours after the concussion. Make sure you have a responsible adult around to watch you for any signs of your condition getting worse.

Although most people recover after a concussion, how quickly they improve depends on many factors. These factors include how severe their concussion was, their age, how healthy they were before the concussion, and how they take care of themselves after the injury. Some people who have had a concussion find that at first it is hard to do their daily activities, their job, to get along with everyone at home, or to relax.

Rest is very important after a concussion because it helps the brain to heal. After a concussion what to do patient because healing takes time. Only when your symptoms have reduced significantly, in consultation with your health care professional, should you slowly and gradually return to your daily activities, such as work or school.

If your symptoms come back after a concussion what to do you get new symptoms as you become more active, this is a sign that you are pushing yourself too hard. Stop these how to have a sex and take more time to rest and recover.

As the days go by, you can expect to gradually feel better. Parents and caregivers of children who have had a concussion can help them recover by taking an active role in their recovery:. If you already had a medical condition at the time of your concussion such as chronic headachesit may take longer for you to recover from the concussion. Anxiety and depression may also make it harder to adjust to the symptoms of a concussion. While you are healing, you should be very careful to avoid doing anything after a concussion what to do could cause a bump, blow, or jolt to the head or body.

On rare occasions, receiving another concussion before the brain has healed can result in brain swelling, permanent brain damage, and even death, particularly among children and teens.

After you have recovered from your concussion, you should protect yourself from having another one. Learn more about potential long-term outcomes of concussion and other forms of TBI. Skip directly to site content Skip directly to page options Skip directly to A-Z link. Section Navigation. Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Syndicate. Minus Related Pages. Getting Better: Tips for Adults Get plenty of sleep at night, and rest during the day.

Avoid activities that are physically demanding e. They can make your symptoms worse and slow your recovery. Avoid activities, such as contact or recreational sports, that could lead to another concussion.

It is best to avoid roller coasters or other high speed rides that can make your symptoms worse or even cause a concussion. When your health care professional says you are well enough, return to your normal activities gradually, not all at once. Because your ability to react may be slower after a concussion, ask your health care professional when you can safely drive a car, ride a bike, or operate heavy equipment. Talk with your health care professional about when you can return to work.

Ask about how you can help your employer understand what has happened to you. Consider talking with your employer about returning to work gradually and about changing your work activities or schedule until you recover e. Take only those drugs that your health care professional has approved. Do not drink alcoholic beverages until your health care professional says you are well enough.

Alcohol and other what does salvation lies within mean may slow your recovery and put you at risk of further injury. Write down the things that may be harder than usual for you to remember. Consult with family members or close friends when making important decisions. Do not neglect your basic needs, such as eating well and getting enough rest.

Some people report that flying in airplanes makes their symptoms worse shortly after a concussion. Getting Better: Tips for Children Parents and caregivers of children who have had a concussion can help them recover by taking an active role in their recovery: Having the child get plenty of rest. Keep a regular sleep schedule, including no late nights and no sleepovers. Children should not return to these types of activities until their health care professional says they are well enough.

Giving the child only those drugs that are approved by the pediatrician or family physician. Talking with their health care professional about when the child should return to school and other activities and how the parent or caregiver can help the child deal with the challenges that the child may face. For example, your child may need to spend fewer hours at school, rest often, or require more time to take tests. Help Prevent Long-Term Problems If you already had a medical condition at the time of your concussion such as chronic headachesit after a concussion what to do take longer for you to recover from the how to get software contracts. Related Pages.

Get Email Updates. To receive email updates about this topic, enter your email address: Email Address. What's this? Links with this icon indicate that you are leaving the CDC website. Linking to a non-federal website does not constitute an endorsement by CDC or any of its employees of the sponsors or the information and products presented on the website. You will be subject to the destination website's privacy policy when you follow the link.

CDC is not responsible for Section compliance accessibility on other federal or private website. Cancel Continue.

Getting Better: Tips for Adults

Aug 11,  · Light activity, such as walking or riding a stationary bike, may actually help in your recovery, as long as it doesn’t worsen the symptoms. Be smart. Rest and recover. Returning to sports . What to Expect After a Concussion A concussion may be caused by a blow, bump or jolt to the head, or by any fall or hit that jars the brain. This invisible injury disrupts the way the brain works by decreasing mental stamina, as the brain must work longer and harder even to complete simple tasks. In the first few days following a concussion, take it easy, but don’t shut down every aspect of your life. Go for walks, get outside, try reading. You’re allowed to do .

Persistent post-concussive symptoms, also called post-concussion syndrome, occurs when concussion symptoms last beyond the expected recovery period after the initial injury. The usual recovery period is weeks to months. These symptoms may include headaches, dizziness, and problems with concentration and memory.

Concussion is a mild traumatic brain injury that usually happens after a blow to the head. It can also occur with violent shaking and movement of the head or body.

You don't have to lose consciousness to get a concussion or experience persistent post-concussive symptoms. In fact, the risk of developing persistent post-concussive symptoms doesn't appear to be associated with the severity of the initial injury. In most people, symptoms occur within the first seven to 10 days and go away within three months. Sometimes, they can persist for a year or more. Post-concussion headaches can vary and may feel like tension-type headaches or migraines.

Most often, they are tension-type headaches. These may be associated with a neck injury that happened at the same time as the head injury. See a doctor if you experience a head injury severe enough to cause confusion or amnesia — even if you never lost consciousness.

If a concussion occurs while you're playing a sport, don't go back in the game. Seek medical attention so that you don't risk worsening your injury. Some experts believe persistent post-concussive symptoms are caused by structural damage to the brain or disruption of the messaging system within the nerves, caused by the impact that caused the concussion. Others believe persistent post-concussive symptoms are related to psychological factors.

The most common symptoms — headache, dizziness and sleep problems — are similar to those often experienced by people diagnosed with depression, anxiety or post-traumatic stress disorder. In many cases, both physical damage of brain trauma and emotional reactions to these effects play a role in the development of symptoms. However, some research shows that certain factors are more common in people who develop persistent post-concussive symptoms compared with those who don't.

These factors include a history of depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, significant life stressors, a poor social support system and lack of coping skills. More research is still needed to better understand how and why persistent post-concussive symptoms happen after some injuries and not others.

The only known way to prevent the development of persistent post-concussive symptoms is to avoid the head injury in the first place. Although you can't prepare for every potential situation, here are some tips for avoiding common causes of head injuries:. Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products.

Advertising revenue supports our not-for-profit mission. Don't delay your care at Mayo Clinic Schedule your appointment now for safe in-person care. This content does not have an English version. This content does not have an Arabic version. Request an appointment. Overview Persistent post-concussive symptoms, also called post-concussion syndrome, occurs when concussion symptoms last beyond the expected recovery period after the initial injury. Request an Appointment at Mayo Clinic.

Share on: Facebook Twitter. Show references Smith ST. Postconcussion syndrome: An overview for clinicians. Psychiatric Annals. Mullally WJ. The American Journal of Medicine. In press. Accessed May 30, Tapia RN, et al.

Rehabilitation of persistent symptoms after concussion. Evans RW. Postconcussion syndrome. Accessed May 24, Ferri FF. Postconcussive syndrome. In: Ferri's Clinical Advisor Philadelphia, Pa. Accessed June 2, Bramley H, et al. Mild traumatic brain injury and post-concussion syndrome. Sports Medicine and Arthroscopy Review. Schultz BA expert opinion. Mayo Clinic. What can I do to help prevent traumatic brain injury? Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Accessed Sept. Bellamkonda E expert opinion.

Child passenger safety. Mayo Clinic Marketplace Check out these best-sellers and special offers on books and newsletters from Mayo Clinic.

2 thoughts on “After a concussion what to do

  1. Tegami

    I love how caring aurora is she literally just grabbed crystals hand so gently aww

    Reply

Add a comment

Your email will not be published. Required fields are marked *